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REEVALUATION OF TERMINOLOGY OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE THROUGH THE LENS OF EUROPEAN MEDICAL SCIENCE (PART ONE: JING AND QI)
Vandenko V.A.



         Vyacheslav Anatolievich Vandenko – Physician, PhD in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

E-mail: slava_gloriya@mail.ru


Annotation

The scientific advancement attained nowadays in the domain of biology, medicine and sinology allows for an adequate scientific interpretation of traditional categories of Chinese medicine known as jing and qi.

The term jing – the way it is manifest in Chinese medical treatises – is polysemous; it comprises several semantic meanings, which should be differentiated.

Pre-Heaven Essence (Congenital jing) is arguably identical to DNA owing to the similar functions it performs and the overall role it plays in the functioning of the human body. Post-Heaven Essence (Acquired jing) is analogous with hormones (enzymes), which coordinate the genetic performance of the cells in various tissues of the body at large. Reproductive jing presupposes sperm (and semen) and eggs respectively. Kidney jing (jing of kidneys) regulates the excretory, endocrinological and metabolic functions of the organism.

Qi in traditional Chinese medicine has more varieties and subtypes than jing.

One normally distinguishes between the following types: Original Qi, Primary Qi, Nutritive Qi, Protective Qi, Organ Qi, and Qi of Channels and Collaterals, ? all of them constituting Normal Qi of the human body.

Original Qi or Primordial Qi can be argued to possess the identical characteristics to those of a gene, whilst Nutritive Qi can be categorized as plasma of blood when it comes to its structural characteristics and functions. Primary Qi can be viewed as arterial blood analog. Protective Qi or Guard Qi or Defensive Qi is indicative of lymph in terms of its qualities and location. The transform-ing activity of Qi should be viewed qua endocrinological functioning of the body; in its turn, Qi of Channels and Collaterals, as well as Organ Qi, correlate with ions of substances or electrolytes, and are believed to be the manifestation of neuro-endocrinological activity.

        Key words: Traditional Chinese medicine, medical canons, Dao medicine, jing, qi.


 
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